Author Topic: Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival  (Read 8018 times)

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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« on: September 06, 2005, 07:42:04 PM »
Mark this on your calander, it's a really fun and lively event.
Sample hundreds of brews from all over the country at the new Denver Convention Center!!!  It's the largest beer event in the country!

Thursday thru Saturday (September 29-October 1)
General Admission Beer Tasting Session: 5:30 pm-10:00 pm
(Last pour 9:45 pm)

Here are the facts:
Breweries at Fest: 380
Beers at the Fest: 1,669
 8O
There's also food and other goodies there.

General Admission Tickets:
Friday and Thursday: $35 in advance, $40 at the door.
Saturday: $40 in advance, $45 at the door.
The price includes a free pint voucher at the Wynkoop, and a 2 for 1 lift coupon at Winter Park and Copper Mountain.
Tickets are available at the ticket counter at the Convention Center.

For more details check out:
www.GreatAmericanBeerFestival.com
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BHase

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2005, 07:44:41 PM »
And don't ignore this event either. In Germany, I saw a chart that had all the major beer festivals in the world on it. The Great American Beer Festival in Denver was actually marked, one of maybe 15 or 20 global events.

Ben
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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2005, 07:44:41 PM »

92UrS4

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2005, 07:49:04 PM »
It is fun, I haven't been for a number of years now. Money, logistics and health have seemed to override my ability to go!

Maybe this year is the year I come back. I only have one glass still in tact. From like 97 or 98 or something like that.

aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2005, 07:52:01 PM »
bumped into Pat at last year's event -- trying to locate each other on our cell phones with a good buzz and tons of distractions going on was funny.

I was really impressed with the stouts and porters last year -- some unique brews flavored with chocolate or coffee were especially yummy, and the couple milk stouts went down really smooth and tasty.
Keep your program and mark down the good ones, because there's no way you are going to remember any of the beers after the night is through.
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2005, 07:52:52 PM »
That sounds fun - I might be interested in going on Friday after work. I'm assuming the $35 allows you to have free reign on the tasting inside?

Funny, I also received an e-mail from Lola Grill about a $45 tequila social.... both options are expensive but very tempting.
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2005, 07:55:24 PM »
Quote from: "aowhaus"

Keep your program and mark down the good ones, because there's no way you are going to remember any of the beers after the night is through.

Exactly... its certainly one of those things, no matter how goofy you look doing it, you should take a notepad and jot down the memorable brews. I went to an Oktoberfest beer garden in Seattle a couple of years ago, tried sooo many great NW beers and forgot most of them by the end of the day. :(
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ianacole

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2005, 07:58:48 PM »
Does the price of admission include a free taxi ride home?  :lol:
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2005, 08:01:28 PM »
I'll be riding the bus.... :lol:
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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2005, 08:05:53 PM »
Quote from: "hotani"
That sounds fun - I might be interested in going on Friday after work. I'm assuming the $35 allows you to have free reign on the tasting inside?


Yup, free reign.  You get a large shot glass-sized souvenier cup, and they literally let you loose on the convention floor.  1,669 brews to taste, no limit to any of them.  Some of the breweries also offer free food pairings (cheese, chocolate, breads, appetizers, etc.) to their brews.

You could feel the love in the convention center!
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2005, 08:07:30 PM »
Wow - sounds good. Anyone else interested in going Friday?
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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2005, 08:21:13 PM »
I could go on Friday -- it would be easier for me to head straight there from my office.

Let's get a GTG going!

I could offer to host something afterwards at my loft so that everyone could sober up before heading home.
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2005, 08:28:02 PM »
sounds good to me. I'm downtown as well, so I can just walk over after work.
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jfrahm

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2005, 10:25:05 PM »
Friday night is the crazy drunk frat boy tasting session, or so I'm told.  I like the Saturday Afternoon session where the winners are announced.  More relaxed.

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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2005, 03:25:59 AM »
As much as I hate anything 'drunk frat boy' related, I am limited to Friday or Thursday since I'll most likely have my son with me over the weekend.
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jfrahm

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2005, 01:18:11 PM »
Well, I don't know how bad it gets but be advised that it is the night where people go to pound beers for a nice flat rate.  I have heard some crazy stories that make it sound pretty bad (people throwing up on the floor, etc.)  Don't judge the fest by that session.

The GABF is one of the the top events in the world.  In fact, some experts say USA brewers have surpassed Belgium and Germany and now produce the best beers in the world.  As you can imagine this is something of a controversy, but the USA does have the tradition of stealing whatever we want from other cultures and trying to make the best of it.  The GABF also has a lot of variety as American brewers brew nearly every style of beer imagineable (which is less common elsewhere in the world.)

A bunk of international beer geeks I know will be there.  Should be fun.
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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2005, 01:38:56 PM »
yeah, I remember some non-American beers there.
I think Canadians still make the best beers around -- my favorites: Creemore Springs, Sleemans, and Upper Canada Brewery.

I remember quite a few college and frat kids there on a Saturday, but it didn't bother me.  Everyone was having a fun time and I haven't been in a place with so many happy and friendly people around.
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Eric18T

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2005, 01:53:27 PM »
where do all you guys work downtown? We should meet up for lunch sometime. I am up at 17th and broadway.

jfrahm

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #17 on: September 07, 2005, 02:38:17 PM »
I don't recall any non-USA brewers present, but naturally there are beers of nearly every style in the world.  It would be interesting to go to the World Beer Cup and see how the USA beers stack up (in like styles) to the overseas counterparts, many of which are not exported to the USA or do not travel well.

Canada makes some great beers.   Unibroue is a favorite of mine.  
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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2005, 03:06:50 PM »
I work at 18th and Wynkoop (across the street from the Wynkoop Brew Pub).
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BHase

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2005, 06:27:33 PM »
Quote from: "jfrahm"
The GABF is one of the the top events in the world.  In fact, some experts say USA brewers have surpassed Belgium and Germany and now produce the best beers in the world.  As you can imagine this is something of a controversy, but the USA does have the tradition of stealing whatever we want from other cultures and trying to make the best of it.


As a bit of an international beer geek and connoisseur (???) myself, I have to say that I wholeheartedly agree with the importance of the GABF, as I stated in my first post on this topic.

However, I would really like to know how these 'experts' came to the conclusion that American beers have surpassed Belgian and German beers.  As a frequent drinker of many different types of beers, and from many different areas, I can safely say that few regions produce beers like those of another.  For example, even the yeast cultures used in the brewing process can be significantly different; Weihenstephan, which has existed in Germany since ca. 1060, has a yeast culture that is the product of almost a millenium of brewing research. The Belgians have groups such as the Trappist and Ciceran monks, whose beers are similar to some others, but truly unique in many ways.  Some so unique that they are protected by international trademark laws, e.g. the Belgian lambic. And in some countries, such as the U.K., the malt is purposely burnt to produce a far darker and more 'roasted' taste in beers, a practice which wouldn't even be admissible in Germany under the Reinheitsgebot, or Purity Law, propagated sometime in the mid-1500s.

Next is the nature of the brewing industry.  There is no brewery in the world that can rival Anheuser-Busch in size, but in my opinion, these breweries produce for quantity.  Even if we are to take a large brewery such as St. James, which produces Guinness, we can see that while a good beer is produced, there is a lack of variety (in the case of Guinness you can pick between stout and extra stout).  However, the majority of European brewing is done in small beer houses, comparable to the American microbrewery.  As frequentors of Germany will attest, you rarely order a brand of beer (e.g. Paulaner, Becks) in a German restaurant, rather you order by type (e.g. dark hefeweizen, pilsner).  This is possible because there is a vast abundance of small local breweries that form exclusive contracts with the beer halls and restaurants.  So you may often not even know exactly what it is that you are drinking (unless you look at the glass or at the sign presented generally on the front of the building).  This emphasis does not exist in the United States; you know when you're drinking a Fat Tire from New Belgium over a Michelob Amber Bock, because it is the brand you order, not the type (in this case, amber).

None of this is to prove one's worth over another, rather it is to show that the regional differences both in the process of making beer and in the method of distributing (insofar as there are different philosophies of what makes a good brewery) lead to a global beer culture that does not allow for comparisons such as "X is better than Y", but only for "I like X better than Y".  I know it wasn't your statement, but I felt it was important enough to address. And this is an online forum. And I am a beer snob. :)

Ben
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2005, 07:08:22 PM »
Quote from: "Eric18T"
where do all you guys work downtown? We should meet up for lunch sometime. I am up at 17th and broadway.


16th and Broadway. :)


As for the USA beers vs Rest of The World, from what I've tried so far I'm going with American beer. We can't build a decent car but we sure did get the beer right.

I've tried many different styles of beers from other countries, and being an ale man myself, I tend to lean towards English and Irish brews rather than the German lagers - and I haven't been very impressed with the Belgian beers I've had so far, which means absolutely nothing since I haven't had that many.

Overall the American stuff I've had so far has been the most impressive. Specifically the IPAs and wheat beers. However, there is a special place in my heart for Irish stouts - namely Guinness and Murphey's. America has yet to produce a Guinness-killer. :)
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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2005, 07:19:31 PM »
Quote from: "BHase"
Quote from: "jfrahm"
The GABF is one of the the top events in the world.  In fact, some experts say USA brewers have surpassed Belgium and Germany and now produce the best beers in the world.  As you can imagine this is something of a controversy, but the USA does have the tradition of stealing whatever we want from other cultures and trying to make the best of it.


As a bit of an international beer geek and connoisseur (???) myself, I have to say that I wholeheartedly agree with the importance of the GABF, as I stated in my first post on this topic.

However, I would really like to know how these 'experts' came to the conclusion that American beers have surpassed Belgian and German beers.  As a frequent drinker of many different types of beers, and from many different areas, I can safely say that few regions produce beers like those of another.  For example, even the yeast cultures used in the brewing process can be significantly different; Weihenstephan, which has existed in Germany since ca. 1060, has a yeast culture that is the product of almost a millenium of brewing research. The Belgians have groups such as the Trappist and Ciceran monks, whose beers are similar to some others, but truly unique in many ways.  Some so unique that they are protected by international trademark laws, e.g. the Belgian lambic. And in some countries, such as the U.K., the malt is purposely burnt to produce a far darker and more 'roasted' taste in beers, a practice which wouldn't even be admissible in Germany under the Reinheitsgebot, or Purity Law, propagated sometime in the mid-1500s.

Next is the nature of the brewing industry.  There is no brewery in the world that can rival Anheuser-Busch in size, but in my opinion, these breweries produce for quantity.  Even if we are to take a large brewery such as St. James, which produces Guinness, we can see that while a good beer is produced, there is a lack of variety (in the case of Guinness you can pick between stout and extra stout).  However, the majority of European brewing is done in small beer houses, comparable to the American microbrewery.  As frequentors of Germany will attest, you rarely order a brand of beer (e.g. Paulaner, Becks) in a German restaurant, rather you order by type (e.g. dark hefeweizen, pilsner).  This is possible because there is a vast abundance of small local breweries that form exclusive contracts with the beer halls and restaurants.  So you may often not even know exactly what it is that you are drinking (unless you look at the glass or at the sign presented generally on the front of the building).  This emphasis does not exist in the United States; you know when you're drinking a Fat Tire from New Belgium over a Michelob Amber Bock, because it is the brand you order, not the type (in this case, amber).

None of this is to prove one's worth over another, rather it is to show that the regional differences both in the process of making beer and in the method of distributing (insofar as there are different philosophies of what makes a good brewery) lead to a global beer culture that does not allow for comparisons such as "X is better than Y", but only for "I like X better than Y".  I know it wasn't your statement, but I felt it was important enough to address. And this is an online forum. And I am a beer snob. :)

Ben


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Real man of genius...
[/b]

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BHase

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #22 on: September 07, 2005, 07:25:54 PM »
Quote from: "hotani"
As for the USA beers vs Rest of The World, from what I've tried so far I'm going with American beer.


You must be one of the experts.  :D

Ben
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #23 on: September 07, 2005, 07:30:35 PM »
Self-proclaimed. :P
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jfrahm

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #24 on: September 07, 2005, 07:59:04 PM »
Who brews the best beer in the world is a luridly philosphical (and perpetual) debate.  AB, Lebatts, St. James Gate, and other megas don't really enter into it.  Every country has it's megas.  When I was in Belgium I was astounded that I could choose from several fantastic trappist beers in a night shop at 2:00am, yet the locals tended to get tall boys of Jupiler to drink on the street.  Whatever.

How does New Glarus in Wisconsin compare to Fantome in the Ardennes?  How does Great Lakes or Goose Island's Dortmunder style stack up against Wolnzach?  Impossible to say.  We can judge them and give them medals, but that will not end the debate.

From what I have seen/tried/experienced, I feel that the USA generally produces the best beer.  That is to say, of all the styles of the world, given a fair blind tasting, the USA will generally have more beers in the top three than any other single country.  Heller or Spezial might have a better rauchbier, St. Sixtus (or for that matter St. Bernardus) a better Quadruppel, but the USA produces a great if not the best example of nearly every category.  If I had to pick a country to produce the beer I drink henceforth, it'd be the USA and I would survive (but I'd be begging Great Lakes to clone the best Bamberg Rauchbiers and Keesman Bock effectively.)

This is mostly a factor of the USA's size, our diversity, our ability to attract brewers from around the world to work in the USA, and the fiercely competitive spirit of the USA brewers.

The best brewery equipment probably still comes from Germany. :-)

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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #25 on: September 21, 2005, 04:22:13 PM »
So who's in for Friday 9/30? Just want to make sure I won't be on my own if I'm dropping $35! :)
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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #26 on: September 21, 2005, 04:48:34 PM »
I could make it on Friday (the ultimate afterwork happy hour).

I think Andrew and Pat may be interested.
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hotani

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #27 on: September 21, 2005, 06:07:53 PM »
well ok then. I'll get a ticket and meet you guys somewhere between here and there with my little notepad friday. :)
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aowhaus

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Sept.29-Oct. 1: The Great American Beer Festival
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2005, 01:41:40 PM »
Andrew will be out of town, but I have a couple other friends joining me on Friday.
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« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2005, 02:09:08 PM »
Holy crap... looked online for tix:

Quote

Tickets (Great American Beer Festival)     
Full Price Ticket    US $40.00 x 1
Total Convenience Charge(s)

   US $5.75 x 1

Order Processing Charge(s)    US $3.30
ticketFast Delivery

   US $2.50

TOTAL CHARGES    US $51.55

Wow. $10 of BS "handling" charges. I'll buy em at the door, or go by today. Anyone know if you can just walk over and buy tix at the convention center anytime?
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