Author Topic: Acid staining garage floor?  (Read 3522 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Cole

  • Heavily Modded
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,035
    • http://rockcrawler.com
Acid staining garage floor?
« on: November 28, 2005, 10:17:47 PM »
Anyone here done this?

My new 4 car garage will be done soon and I am thinking about staining the garage floor before I move anything into it.

(Don't want the Audi to have a boring old garage to live in)

Picture?

Cole Ford
Financial Advisor

03Indigo

  • Global Moderator
  • Supercar
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,686
Acid staining garage floor?
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2005, 10:21:06 PM »
Alan W. (Aowhaus) should chime in on this one when he reads in on this thread.

Rocky Mountain Club B5

Acid staining garage floor?
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2005, 10:21:06 PM »

Eric18T

  • Heavily Modded
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,668
Acid staining garage floor?
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2005, 10:28:11 PM »
cole- we used a clear epoxy sealent that we bought at lowes or homedepot. It works ok at sealing the concrete, but nothing fancy.

Cole

  • Heavily Modded
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,035
    • http://rockcrawler.com
Acid staining garage floor?
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2005, 10:30:47 PM »
I was really thinking of doing a dark (red/brown) color. Then painting the walls maybe a dark mustard yellow. Not sure yet on the wall color. Then the work benches will be stained wood with stainless steel hardware. Should look like a nice classic workshop.

Not totally sure on the colors yet. Just wondering about the staining, durability(when sealed) etc.

Cole Ford
Financial Advisor

03Indigo

  • Global Moderator
  • Supercar
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,686
Acid staining garage floor?
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2005, 11:19:55 PM »
Taken from www.acid-stain.com

They talk about sealing and from what I know, it is VERY durable.  Many high traffic areas have this done to them, and since the stain penetrates into the concrete, as the concrete might wear down, but the color holds through part of the surface.  Also, with the seal, it will also be resistant to water and probably some garage fluid spills....but not all.  I am sure radiator fluid would alter the finish, etc.

anyway...here is what they said on their site....

1.   Where can I apply Acid Stain?
Acid Stain can be applied to any concrete, polymer overlay and some self leveling products that have a cementitious base, including most interior and exterior floors, counter tops and walls.

2.   Floor preparation.
All floors need to be cleaned and prepared before Acid Stain application.

Exterior Floors: Concrete should be cured (at least 28 days). Do not acid wash prior to acid staining! Surface contaminants such as curing agents, glue, sealers, waxes, paint, oil, dirt, water repellents and anything that will prevent stain penetration must be removed. There are several steps in cleaning an exterior floor. Always degrease surface, TSP. ( Tri Sodium Phosphate) is a good cleaner, degreaser and easy to use detergent. Rinse well after degreasing and check for water absorption, if there any area where the water beads, treat again. and re do as necessary. After degreasing pressure wash or clean by mechanical means. Once the floor is thoroughly clean and grease free allow to dry and proceed with Acid Stain application

Interior Floors: Concrete should be cured (28 days). Do not acid wash prior to acid staining. Surface contaminants such as curing agents, glue, sealers, waxes, paint, oil, dirt, water repellents and anything that will prevent stain penetration must be removed. Degrease floor and check for water absorption, water beads indicate the presence of a contaminant and floor must be re treated until water is readily absorbed by concrete. When rinsing and cleaning an interior floor use a wet vac to avoid run off and to prevent staining adjacent areas. After degreasing clean floor with by mechanical means if possible e.g. shot blasting, sanding, or with a floor buffer. Rinse one more time to remove dust and dirt, mask all walls with tape and paper and any object you may want to protect,. and proceed with staining.

Saw Cutting: Score lines add a new dimension to acid stain, they provide a natural barrier between colors and enable you to create more eye catching designs. Use a 4” and 7” saw with diamond blades. Mark your lines with chalk and cut to a depth of about 1/4”, being careful not to over cut corners and or to miss the lines, use the 4” saw for small detail and larger saw for long straight lines. There are companies that manufacture saws just for this purpose that allow you to cut straight lines much quicker.

Stencil Designs: Custom designs can be created by using stencils and sand blasting. This technique is a little bit more advanced but the results are outstanding. Please consult your supplier about the proper method of application and necessary training.

3.   Application:
You will need assorted brushes and sprayers to apply Acid Stain, 1 Qt. spray bottles and 1 to 2 gallon pump sprayers will do fine, use equipment with no metal parts. Shake container before use and fill sprayers. Apply in a non uniform way making sure you wet the entire area and follow up immediately with a brush, and “work” the stain into the concrete in a circular motion to add to the random effect., varying degrees of fizzing will occur in different areas and color may not show right away, remember this is a chemical reaction and some colors react slower than others. Apply uniformly throughout entire area. Let stain dry and then apply a second coat the same way.

4.   Neutralizing and Rinsing:
After Acid Stain has dried the surface must be scrubbed and neutralized. Using a medium stiffness brush, apply a mixture of water and baking soda over surface, gently brush entire area and the rinse thoroughly with clean water. Protect adjacent area from run off and allow to dry completely before sealing.

5.   Sealing or Waxing:
After floor is completely dry apply two coats of clear non yellowing sealer and or wax. Consult your supplier about types of sealer to use for interior or exterior applications and for instructions on how to and when to apply wax.

Cole

  • Heavily Modded
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,035
    • http://rockcrawler.com
Acid staining garage floor?
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2005, 11:58:56 PM »
Thanks for the link. I have actually read about everything on the net I can find alread. The problem is that there is conflicting information about how durable it is in a garage.

Seems to me like it would be fine. But, I have also noticed in some stores, coffee shops, bars etc that have stainded floors there is a "wear pattern" in the high traffic areas. From what I have read this might be a problem with the tires of the car.

Looking for additional information.

(color suggestions and other ideas are welcome too)

I want a warm, quality craftsman's shop feel. Not the surgical cold feel you get with just a painted grey floor.

Cole Ford
Financial Advisor

aowhaus

  • Heavily Modded
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,889
Acid staining garage floor?
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2005, 04:11:31 AM »
sorry, I've been pretty busy so I haven't been on the forums for a while.

Cole, if you could remember, the second floor of my loft was acid stained.
I didn't do it myself, as working with hydrochloric acid and the prep work is quite an ordeal.  The company I hired to do it did quite a few banks and commercial spaces my office designed.  It is quite a durable finish as it penetrates the concrete and the color is a result from the chemical reaction with the lime and other minerals in the concrete.
My floors had three applications of two different colors of acid stain to achieve that deep stone like tone with subtle highlights.  On top of that a new type of acrylic sealer was used that is more durable than traditional sealers.  The floors require very little maintanence -- a light sweeping or vacuuming is all you need and if you need to mop it a very mild concentration of Spic & Span floor cleaner for wood floors in warm water should do the trick.
Many restaurants, bars and stores that have acid staining done but shows traffic wear is probably due to improper final sealant of the floors and/or the use of harsh detergents to clean it.

Your garage floor should reasonably smooth and free of any stains or paint or plaster splatters or drips as any contaminants in the concrete will show like a sore thumb as it will prevent the acid from reacting from the concrete.
Because acid staining is a chemical reaction the colors are limited to warm hues of browns, reds and yellows.  My floors are as dark and cool looking as you could get -- I had one application of ebony, an application of turquoise and a final application of ebony again.  But I'd guess you want to have a warmer look and not the typical grey color.
As being in the garage, you will probably have some oil drips as well as some other automotive fluids/coolants/salt/mag chloride that may get on to the floor -- I'm not sure how the sealer will hold up to that but I believe that the acid stain should hold up to that kind of wear.

If I could recall, acid staining costs around $2.50 to $3.00 a sq.ft. depending on the condition of the concrete and color.  I could give you a contact name for the guys that did my place -- they are the best in the business.

If you want a cheap and easy alternative, I suggest staining the concrete yourself using Minwax wood stain.  My last house I made a concrete countertop for my bathroom and I used Minwax Ebony wood stain to darken the concrete to a charcoal color and I then sealed it with Thompson's water seal and polished it with an application of parafin wax.  That held up very well.
I also stained one of my lower closets in my current loft with an application of Minwax Red Mahogany let it dry for a day and applied a layer of Minwax oil-based polyurethane (for floors).  It looks really cool, like distressed leather as it really brings out the subtle textures, cracks and irregularties of the concrete.

Another cool alternative is rubber tile flooring.  Johnsonite makes a great line of recycled rubber tile flooring that are interlocking and comes in 25" squares.  It is rather heavy and thick so there's no need to glue it down.  The rubber is designed to be impact and puncture resistant -- it's used in excercise rooms and sports facilities where it is subjected to ice skates, soccer and golf shoes cleates, etc.  It's a little on the pricey side, as a 20'x20' space (about a size of a 2-car garage) would cost about $1,200.
If you are interested I have a 20'x20' area that will be auctioned off for charity with a $300 starting bid.

I think I've covered everything.  Give me a call if you need further assistance.
2008 Mercedes Benz C300 4matic Sport
2004 Aprilia Mojito Custom 50